Anxiety Presents an Opportunity for Greater Glory

Every time we accept invitations into new opportunities, we step into a new version of discomfort. We go from a known to an unknown because we believe that it will be better in the new place even if there is a cost to getting there. There are times that we experience discomfort in new circumstances that we didn’t choose but that were forced on us. In either case, the opportunity in the discomfort is the same.

When we get to this new place of unknown challenges and uncertain outcomes, we often (if not always) can recognize insecurities within us if we will pay attention. In that place where we are no longer comfortable, we are likely to feel a sense of threat. Often we will be anxious surrounding our protection, provision or promotion/place. If we aren’t careful, we may very well be offended or suspicious of people in this new environment as we view them through our lens of anxiety as we guess at their motives or overreact to their interactions.

In these new places where we are tempted to envy, judge, compete, be offended, etc. because we are afraid as we experience lack of control, we are presented an eternal opportunity. The insecurities that are driving the anxiety and mental gymnastics were there prior to their exposure via this new set of circumstances. They are simply ripe at this particular time for redemption.

Where God shows us the ugliness of us in the middle of our discomfort or suffering, we get to choose. We can agree with fear or come home to His love. We can foster the temporal anxiety or run home to the comfort and certainty of eternity. His love dwells within us by the grace of Jesus (if we want it to and receive the sacrifice of Jesus for the restoration of relationship with the Father) so the peace that relieves the anxiety is in Him within us.

It’s at this point that we are granted repentance. We are given the gift of getting to exchange the insecurity of an orphan which wasn’t yet redeemed and trading it in for the security of a legitimate child of God. When we feel the ugly stuff, we can own our part of the emotions instead of blaming people and circumstances for our discomfort and exchange our crud for God’s glory. He will be put on display from within us when we choose to submit the temporal fear for His eternal love.

Defeating Insecurity

When my dad died in December, I had no doubt that he loved me and was proud of me. His affirmation and my knowledge of his unconditional love and acceptance was and is an incredible gift. It is healthy and necessary for my security and confidence. It was a platform for my potential. Yet, I mess it up.

Despite the benefit of affirmation and the resulting security that comes from unconditional love, there are times when my insecurities win out. I can be victimized by doubts and fears like anyone else when I forget who I am or when I work from my voids. Insecurity is a universal challenge and there is no earthly cure.

There is perhaps more insecurity in the ministry world than there is in secular settings. In a secular setting, the lines are clear; we are out for ourselves for the most part. Courtesy, morality and values should influence our interactions as there are lines that are drawn in keeping with social responsibility. For the most part, behaviors are oriented by expectations with consequences and ramifications that require strategy to maneuver around.

In faith based settings, I’ve noticed less certainty and more apparent insecurity. We acknowledge and embrace that we are spiritual beings, therefore we tend to work from the inside-out. The truth is the guide and foundation for our beliefs, but our choices are influenced by our developing ability to allow those beliefs to overcome our will. Our will is born in a fallen state, and even after we are new from the inside, that salvation is being worked out.

In the working out, we often allow emotions, expectations and desires that are based in “good” and even eternal appetites to guide our interactions. “That’s not my heart” becomes a valid excuse to behaviors that are offensive or not thoughtful. The squishy possibilities within can muddy the absolutes of cause and effect.

No matter where we are spiritually, the insecurities we battle as members of the human race cause us to self-protect, self-provide and self-promote. We do so in defensive and/or offense postures with other human beings. Where the contrast is in the context of the Father’s house and the Body of Christ, the insecurities seem to become glaring. The insecurities are counter-cultural to the security of sonship.

Until we know that we know that control is an illusion and our Source is greater than our limitations or abilities, we are going to entertain the charade of mastery. Freedom comes in the wake of giving up and admitting our limitations. Security comes where we know that we can’t do it and are loved anyway. Security comes in the love of a Father that not only affirms us, but He receives us despite us.

Freedom is a Process

I was watching an old television show recently in which the bad guy got off on a technicality. He had committed a crime, but the police circumvented the legal process in the accumulation of evidence and the bad guy was set free to do more bad things.

In the practice of criminal law, the question usually isn’t whether they did it or not; it’s whether or not there is evidence to prove it. To some, this can be frustrating as the obvious guilt of an individual calls out for justice. Technicalities, procedure and process seem like a distraction from the point. In fact, respect for liberty requires the process. This is the design of our legal system.

Freedom requires a process. We can’t enjoy the fullness of freedom unless we are willing to go through the process. The uncovering of bondage, hurt and hang-ups is necessary for the realization of freedom, healing and release. This is God’s design.

To get to greater realizations of God’s love, grace and fellowship, we sometimes have to examine the void. We have to look into the areas of our lives where He is not manifest. In those inspections, we will find the opportunities for new glory.

This can be frustrating. Why would a mature follower of Jesus still have to examine their soul? Why would deacons, elders, pastors and other leaders need to go back to square one from time to time? To respect the process; that’s why.

The process is one of exchange. Redemption requires possession and the things that we want to change must be realized to be possessed. Once they are acknowledged and owned, they can be turned in for what is better.

We are all invited into new glory and the new glory is from an infinite Source. There is no end to the goodness and glory of God, so there is no end to the process for us. None of us are exempted from God’s goodness so none of us are afforded the disservice of opting out of the process. The process is the way to realize the freedom.

Order facilitates freedom and freedom facilitates glory. Consider where you are in the process today and ask God if there is more glory that He wants to unleash in your life. As He reveals things that He wants to make new, go there. Embrace the process.

We All Need to Get Suspended Sometimes

There is a controversial battle going on between an NFL star, Ezekiel Elliott, and the NFL right now. There were accusations against him from a former girlfriend that he had physically abused her. The accusations were investigated but no criminal charges were brought. The NFL, however, decided to conduct an independent investigation and ultimately suspended him for six games. Now there is a lawsuit in federal court in an attempt to overturn that suspension.

From the information that is leaking out, the accuser had made threats of ruining and blackmailing him and there are apparently some real questions of her credibility. It’s swayed public opinion to lean in many cases to more of a benefit of the doubt for Elliott. What has come out in those same leaks, however, are some sordid details of a lifestyle that has been cruising towards trouble for some time.

Details regarding sex, drugs, abortion and an apparent embracing of a lifestyle that is out of control have emerged. Despite that apparent immorality, fans have begun to rally behind the running back in hopes that he not be suspended so that he can play without suspension. They want to watch him run and catch. They want to be entertained.

I’m an attorney and believe in due process. Evidence needs to be handled and processed correctly to ascertain an accurate picture of the truth. Without respect for the process, justice is compromised and order gives way to subjectivity and chaos. With that said, while conceding that all I know about this is through the media, it appears that Ezekiel Elliott might need to be suspended for Ezekiel Elliott’s sake, if nothing else.

Consequences are the best thing that can happen to us when we are living in patterns of destructive behavior that are not the intention of our design. Consequences quicken our awareness of our humanity and potentially open us to the kindness of the Lord that leads us to repentance. Getting caught or frustrated in our detours help us put things back on track. We need the order and justice of authority to avoid the downward spiral of rebellion and immorality.

I don’t know what is going to happen with the legal case, suspension, rushing yards, etc. of this 22-year-old young man. I do know, that the appetites and choices of most young men will lead us towards our own harm if we aren’t accountable for those behaviors that will ultimately hurt us and hurt others. We all need to get caught, whether by circumstantial evidence or an airtight case. If not, we are all prone towards the detours that keeps us from our destiny. We all need a suspension sometimes, to keep us from running further and further off the tracks.

We Don’t Get It Until We Live It

The depths of grace never cease to amaze me. Just when I think I see it that much more clearly, I’m situated to walk in it and realize my view is so limited. My accumulation of knowledge regarding grace has not yet perfected my understanding and acceptance of grace. My actions and reactions in the circumstances I experience prove that there is more.

I had a friend tell me recently that he was going through a challenging legal battle a few years ago and was called to testify in a deposition. He would face unjust accusations. His preparation wasn’t a review of the facts, it was alignment with grace. He watched a scene from “The Passion of the Christ” in which Jesus was accused. He watched it over and over for several hours. The example portrayed which Jesus set before us of what grace lived out looks like was brutal. It was Him standing in the face of completely unjust accusation and not defending Himself. With all the defense in the universe available at His command, He stood in the truth of His identity. His identity was the foundation for His freedom. He knew who He was and who His Father was.

When rooted in the security of identity, there is nothing anyone can do to us that draws a defense. They can spit in our face, call us names, get their facts wrong or whatever else but the freedom born of security rooted in identity frees us from the need to respond. That’s grace and there is no fully knowing it until the spit, accusations, and questions come. Even when we are right. Especially when we are right.

I’m just not there. Not completely. I want to be. I’m trying. Yet, not yet.

Sometimes, for some time, I can hold back when the defense or counter-argument is sitting there for the taking. Sometimes, however, I pick up my tool belt and go to work. When I was practicing law, that was good and right. As I am diving deeper into grace, that kind of work produces a loss even when I win.

My friend knew the story of Jesus before he watched the movie that day before his deposition. He knew Jesus personally as Lord and Savior, as well. The experience of picking up his own cross and following Jesus in a way that afforded him the experience of grace is what changed his soul. The experience of grace facilitated the understanding of the knowledge of grace which was incomplete without the exercise of grace.

 

Freedom is in the Flow of Authentic Life

My first year of law school, I had a contracts professor who was the most intimidating professor we “One-Ls” faced that initiation year.  He was a master at what is called the Socratic Method and would work a given subject and a person’s learning of it masterfully by asking one question on top of the other.

The questions he chose surgically peeled back your answer to examine the reason and logic that was used to reach the answer you offered.  Through his cross-examination, you would doubt things you swore to be true just minutes before.  That was the point:  Know the “why” of the conclusions to develop your thinking in order to best advocate the position you represent.

This professor would get most frustrated with students who didn’t want to delve as deeply as he was leading them.  He would rant when it appeared a student was attempting to skip the logical support to get to what they concluded was the rule of law.  The rant was typically something like, “You first-year law students are all the same, ‘The rule; just give me the rule.’  It’s all you think about!”

He was right, but not just about novice law students.  We all want rules to follow.  We want to know where the boundaries are so we can stay between the lines.  If we know what to do, we’ll do it and then we will be accepted or approved of based on our following the rules.  The rules and boundaries make it easier to gauge our performance.

Performance is effort under the law.  A life of grace liberates us to purpose.  Performance is reverse engineering our behavior to look like the thing we want to be.  Grace allows us to simply be it.  The Father desires children walking in purpose to establish His Kingdom, not servants performing for the sake of appearance or approval.  There’s no freedom in pretending or striving to “be”; freedom is realized in the flow of authentic life that happens when we agree with our identity and operate from it.

– From “Transforming the Prodigal Soul” available on Amazon at: https://scottprickett.com/scotts-book/