The One Thing that Fixes Everything

The older that I get, the more challenging things can be. After 52 years, I am less confident in my correctness than ever before, even when I am right. I am increasingly decreasing through humility imposed as much as humility chosen. “Adulting” is no joke.

In my youth, zeal and ignorance kept me from fear. I was too young to know better and that’s not entirely good nor entirely bad; it just is. In fact, having the perspective of a child is ultimately the goal.

Now, I’m a professional Christian. I write things and say things and organize things that center around Jesus because I believe that everyone can benefit from what He is offering. I really do believe . . . and I doubt. I really am passionate . . . and I get weary. I really do want to help people . . . and I get hurt by them. I really do love people . . . and they wear me out. I really do trust God . . . and I’m afraid He won’t come through sometimes.

That list of paradoxical perspectives, feelings, experiences and thoughts could likely go on for quite some time. The uncertainty of me doesn’t change Him. The absoluteness of Him invites that uncertainty of me time and again. He remains who He has always been and invites me and my fluidity to his foundation. In that place, when I seek Him and find Him, there is a restoration and re-filling of contentment, peace, joy and peace.

His grace never gets tired of my agitation. His grace calls to me to step towards the one and eternal solution. The only thing that was ever designed or intended to be everything we need is, thankfully, also the most consistent and never ending thing we can ever imagine. In fact, it is beyond our imagination.

The only thing, place, person or feeling that fixes everything is the love of God. Only when I spend time in pursuit of the first and foremost need do the second and inferior other things take their proper place. Only in the security of relationship to “Abba” or Father God, even “Daddy” God, do my insecurity, inferior logic, busy mindedness, hurt, fear and other distractions fade to insignificant.

For some reason, and unfortunately, I’m too quick to go back to the other stuff once it starts flying at me. Then I am reminded of the open invitation to sit quietly with Him. He approves of me. He likes me. He loves me. He feels the exact same way about you . . . Just ask HIm. He’ll remind you.

Eternity Focused Leadership Development

Moving towards the transition of the organization, an assessment was in order to consider the condition of top leaders and rising stars. A consultant was engaged for the benefit of a third party perspective and time was short before Jesus would turn over the reigns. Following an exhaustive process, the consultant met with Jesus to report his findings.

“Jesus,” the consultant said somewhat reluctantly, “this organization has some problems and the result is alarming as you prepare to transition.”

“What do you mean?” Jesus asked, as if He didn’t know and clearly not alarmed with the negative tone of the consultant.

“Well, your personnel largely aren’t ready,” the consultant continued. “After three years of intensive leadership development and vision casting, most of them just don’t get it.”

Going along with it, Jesus asked, “do you have any examples?”

“Sure,” the consultant replied while pulling out his report to apparently refresh his memory on the details. “First, there are James and John. What I found was that they are in no position to lead. They are simply interested in themselves and their own advancement. I just don’t see where they are ready to be the kind of servant leader you require to continue the culture and DNA of the organization. Remember, they even got their mom to try to influence you for their benefit. (Matthew 20:20-28)

Then, there’s Peter. This guy is going to get you sued. He is very undisciplined and emotionally immature. Talented and bold, for sure, but sloppy.  I recommend a personal coach and some risk management training. (John 18:10)

Thomas is negative; he isn’t fully on board with the direction you have set. He has questions and he voices those doubts, which is detrimental to the morale of the organization. (John 20:25)

The one guy that you have who it diligent and can be trusted to look over organizational resources is Judas. He gets it; he is the most mature, responsible and prepared guy you have to take this thing forward.” (John 13:29)

“Thank you for your time, consideration and report,” Jesus replied as He appeared slightly amused at the conclusions.

“I really appreciate your help, but I’m going with my guys. All that you pointed out about James, John, Peter and Thomas was factually accurate. This is different, though.

For the last three years, I wasn’t trying to perfect their maturity; that will come with suffering and persecution. I was always looking at their heart. You see, My purpose has been and always will be about their heart. I’ve seen their hearts and I know that they will finish what I’ve started.

They will persevere through the difficulty to hand this movement off to the next generation and their passion is worthy of my trust for the purpose of My Kingdom. They have given their hearts to Me and My purposes; that makes them ready to represent me going forward. I trust them; we can work out their other stuff as we go.”

Trusting God . . . or Not

I’d like to say that I trust God, but I wonder if that’s true? If I truly trust Him, why do I experience so much worry, anxiety or fear? Why don’t I just pray and wait when faced with challenges?

Trust is, by definition, “firm belief in the reliability, truth, ability, or strength of someone or something.” With that definition, I must trust God. I firmly believe that God is reliable, true, able and strong so that means I must trust Him, right? Why, then, do I worry and imagine and strive? Maybe another definition is necessary.

The definition of dependence is “the state of relying on or being controlled by someone or something else.” Uh-oh, I think we’re on to something. Being controlled or even reliant are not appealing qualities to me. They don’t even seem very masculine or responsible. I can’t say that I value those traits very highly. Can I really trust without being dependent?

Allowing God to control me and my outcomes and to rely on His goodness takes faith. I have to believe that His ways are better. Hebrews 11:6 says, “And it is impossible to please God without faith. Anyone who wants to come to him must believe that God exists and that he rewards those who sincerely seek him.”

That’s quite a promise but the conditions are significant. He “rewards” those who “seek” Him. Seeking includes the ideas of searching, figuring it out for one’s self . . . craving. There is a demand in the idea of seeking that suggests until the answer is provided, the search will not cease; not even unto death.

Here’s the trick, I think . . . Hebrews doesn’t say that He rewards those that seek the answers to their problems. It doesn’t say that He fixes things for those that ask for stuff. It says that He rewards those that sincerely seek Him without any “give up” in their inquiry. For those that will seek God for God’s sake unto their own death, He is pleased with them to the point of reward.

When focused on my problems, real or imagined, I don’t seek God nor do I trust Him, nor am I dependent on Him. I want what I want when I want it. He is reduced to a tactic to try to get my way. He is kept at arm’s length for the sake of my primary attention going into the problem solving process to control my outcomes and protect my comfort.

When I seek Him for Him with faith that He exists and can be found, the reward is satisfying no matter the answer of the prayers. When I seek Him unto the death of me, the stuff in my life is secondary to the eternal hope and satisfaction found in the intimacy of finding Him.

Do I trust God? Sometimes.

Do you?

You Know Humility Isn’t Weakness, Right?

I got that little jewel handed to me thing morning. Through what has seemed like a battle that has lingered for decades, I’ve realized lately that I’ve been more focused on me than I would care to admit. I have admitted it, however, and the Lord is peeling it back for me to afford increase in the decrease.

Upon sharing with my wife, Julie, another perspective that Holy Spirit stirred related to pride generally and my pride specifically, she lovingly looked at me and offered, “you know humility isn’t weakness, right?” Seriously, it was so sweet and caring and clearly for my best interests that it was incredibly easy to receive.

First knee-jerk reaction was internally something like, “well of course I do.” Within a split second or two, however, I realized that I have put humility and weakness hand in hand. Weakness isn’t an appealing characteristic for me and I don’t suspect it is for most of us. Men may be particularly adverse to the idea of allowing for weakness.

“But he said to me, “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.” Therefore I will boast all the more gladly about my weaknesses, so that Christ’s power may rest on me.” (2 Corinthians 12:9)

By the way; I looked it up . . . “weakness” in that passage means weakness. It means a lack of capacity either in physical terms or in the character of our soul. But that same passage promises perfection and power by way of Christ without the limitations of my body or soul.

Here is what I learned in the past about pride; it isn’t reflective of a strength, but of an insecurity. Pride is self-promotion and the only time that is necessary is when we don’t feel promoted otherwise. So humility is actually a strength as it reflects the realization that, in Christ, we are perfected and empowered. Julie is right; humility isn’t weakness; it is actually strength. The security of knowing your limitations invites the grace of Jesus.

Today I choose to be strong and admit that I am weak. I choose to rest more in His grace than I do in my ability. I welcome His power where my efforts are otherwise limited. You’re invited.

It’s Difficult to Get All of Our Stuff to the Places We Should Be

It really is easier to assimilate. It’s easier to round off the edges and fit into a culture that is tolerant of religion. After all, courteous and passive “belief” that is largely kept to yourself is not offensive as it it is futile. The problem is that passive belief isn’t belief at all; only active belief which is manifested in choices and actions is faith-based confidence.

In Matthew 28, Jesus presented a commissioning; a transfer of authority. The transfer of authority was to go into the world and make disciples. That is, go out and invite people to follow Jesus with the same authority. That necessitates a contrast between the current state and the intended state. In other words, it requires a difference between those that are commissioned and those that are invited.

The contrast is necessary, otherwise the invitation is not compelling. The presentation of an eternal King is dependent on the attributes of that King being evidence of His Kingdom. Watered-down, close-enough mutated religious attempts at a belief system with no real belief is neither compelling nor impressive. Jesus is impressive.

“For the kingdom of God is not a matter of talk but of power.” (1 Corinthians 4:20).

The evidence of the Kingdom of God is the power of God and the power of God is dependent on the presence of God. The presence of God will be most often be seen when we are in reliance on God. We won’t rely on God from a compromised place of courtesy. We will only rely on Him when we are in over our heads as we walk in the authority of His commissioning into places and circumstances that exceed our career strategy or vacation plans.

The more stuff that we have, the more difficult it is to truly not care about anything except for the commissioning. The more comfortable that we are, the more challenging it is to accept the challenges. It’s increasingly as hard as getting a camel through the eye of a needle.

I don’t even want to write this. I certainly don’t always do it. It was easier to actually do it when there was less to tend to. It was easier to actually believe in the contrast of light and dark that exists in the jails and courthouses among people who are in desperate need of hope and healing. Most of the people I interact with aren’t desperate at all; they are well-churched, well-fed and well-rested. And so am I.

 

Two Kinds of Wisdom

We all want wisdom and many of us proclaim wisdom once we think we have something figured out. Those premature declarations are indicators that we’ve attained the wrong or incomplete version of wisdom, however. Wisdom, by definition, comes in two forms; man’s wisdom and God’s wisdom. When we declare our wisdom, we settle for the inferiority of man’s wisdom over the eternal potential of God’s wisdom.

In order to realize the life of Jesus available from within us, we are invited to die to the preferences of our soul (our mind, will and emotions). If/when we will give up our opinions and desires, we can be informed by Holy Spirit’s perspective and not limited to our own. If we will die to ourselves, we will live and enjoy His wisdom and not our cheap substitute.

Wisdom that is me and not Him is “not the wisdom that comes down from above, but is earthly, unspiritual, demonic.” (James 3:15)

The description of my wisdom is given in three terms but they don’t mean the same thing. They can’t mean the same thing, since “unspiritual” and “demonic” are contradictory on their face. Human wisdom, if given priority over the availability of God’s wisdom which is available by submitting our soul has the following progressive (or regressive?) attributes:

  • Earthly – basic wisdom from existing on earth; if you touch fire, it will burn, so don’t touch fire.
  • Unspiritual – “sensuous nature with its subjection to appetite and passion.” This means driven by your own will and emotions, or soul. Beyond just the wisdom of the flesh, this is trusting the wisdom of the soul. It is, in effect, choosing to be your own small “g” god in those areas where you rely on your perspective.
  • Demonic – this is influenced or tormented by the perspective of an enemy that comes against the purposes of God and is intent on destroying you. Nobody would willingly choose this form of wisdom out of the gate; it is a progressive slide where the consequences of soul-ish wisdom lead to a greater depravity and give permission to evil. Sin has a progressive nature (it waits to devour you).

James goes on to say “the wisdom from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, open to reason, full of mercy and good fruits, impartial and sincere.” (3:17) “Good fruits” include “love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control” from Galatians.

That means that God’s wisdom isn’t just knowledge or ability; it is the feeling that comes with contentment as described in James and Galatians. It is without anxiety, fear, worry, shame and guilt. Wisdom from God comes at the expense of your preference but gives you life in abundance where otherwise we are limited to the boundaries of our soul.