Power and Glory

It seems like everything should be able to fit into a series. A nice, packaged summary of all truth related to a topic and a transition to the next thing seems reasonable. After all, one thing gets boring after a while, doesn’t it? Isn’t it best to move on just to sustain interest?

I haven’t found that to be the case. I haven’t been able to get beyond grace. I got turned upside down during a deep, personal dive into the ramifications of grace about four years ago and I’ve never recovered. I don’t want to, either.

“And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we have seen his glory, glory as of the only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth . . . For from his fullness we have all received, grace upon grace. For the law was given through Moses; grace and truth came through Jesus Christ.” (John 1:14, 16-17)

Jesus came to offer us a change. A change of identity and positioning. We were welcomed as adopted children into the Father’s love by the Son. We were invited into His grace if we want to step away from the striving of the law. He would change who we are, how we see things and what increasingly would come out of us. All we have to do is agree.

The time of Jesus’ ministry on earth to the time of His return, which is increasingly imminent, is the time of grace. We are welcomed in and given His right standing (righteousness) with the Father simply by our “yes” to his invitation. It’s been going on for two thousand years and we will know when it’s time to turn the page: “Then will appear in heaven the sign of the Son of Man, and then all the tribes of the earth will mourn, and they will see the Son of Man coming on the clouds of heaven with power and great glory.” (Matthew 24:30)

Until then we enter by His grace, finding a loving Father and a willing Comforter ready to receive us as family. From our place as family and His place within us, the stuff that will come out of us will be inviting of others into His family, as well.

The stuff coming out of us when we are communing with Him is the same thing that invited us in; it will be His grace. His grace through us invites others to commune, too. That’s a message that never ends, until it does, and we’ll know when that is by “power and glory.”

Minding the Gap

I sincerely enjoy what I get to do and am appreciative for the opportunities that I have to do it. The journey has been an amazing, scary, frustrating and fulfilling walk of faith. I am more amazed than ever at the faithfulness of God through the personal experiences He has afforded.

For some of us, there was a time in our lives when everything changed. From that point on, nothing was the same as we were changed from the inside-out. The transformation was initiated by grace as we realized the need to give our lives to Jesus in order to receive the life He bought for us with His own.

The realization of Jesus and surrender to Him and the resulting new birth are vertical experiences. That is, they connect us with the higher perspective. According to Scripture, we become seated in heavenly places (Ephesians 2:6), which is a vertical ascent.

The challenge in walking out the new birth is in the confusion, temptation and illusion that horizontal experiences present. That is, as we live in this world the things of this world capture our attention to distract us from the vertical ascent we once and sometimes realized in Christ Jesus. We live horizontally even if positioned and invited vertically.

I’ve found in ministry that some are very tuned into the vertical but have little to know connection to the reality of the horizontal. That is, they hear from God, have strong faith and appear to be completely aligned with heavenly perspective. Others are completely distracted or consumed with the challenge and opportunity of the horizontal and the vertical isn’t considered when working out earthly circumstances.

Both the vertically minded and the horizontally focused have their strengths and weaknesses. They each can come to be remarkable in their abilities as aligned with their focus. Without the appropriation of the benefits and challenges of each of the two perspectives, the opportunity to agree with God on earth as it is in heaven is missed.

The opportunity of the Kingdom of God is to mind the gap. It’s to stand in the intersection and connect eternal truth with temporary circumstances. It’s to recognize the invisible beyond the visible and bring eternal wisdom to temporal situations. Christ followers are not called to an illusion; they are invited to agree with Him in the advancement of His Truth into temporary facts. Never acknowledging the challenge of those facts is just weird. Never connecting Him to those facts is just disconnected.

Stand in the intersection and pray, minister, listen and assist real people with real stuff. Pay attention to the challenge and pray for the solution. Don’t be so good at the vertical that you miss the horizontal and don’t be so focused on the horizontal that you disregard the vertical.

It’s Difficult to Get All of Our Stuff to the Places We Should Be

It really is easier to assimilate. It’s easier to round off the edges and fit into a culture that is tolerant of religion. After all, courteous and passive “belief” that is largely kept to yourself is not offensive as it it is futile. The problem is that passive belief isn’t belief at all; only active belief which is manifested in choices and actions is faith-based confidence.

In Matthew 28, Jesus presented a commissioning; a transfer of authority. The transfer of authority was to go into the world and make disciples. That is, go out and invite people to follow Jesus with the same authority. That necessitates a contrast between the current state and the intended state. In other words, it requires a difference between those that are commissioned and those that are invited.

The contrast is necessary, otherwise the invitation is not compelling. The presentation of an eternal King is dependent on the attributes of that King being evidence of His Kingdom. Watered-down, close-enough mutated religious attempts at a belief system with no real belief is neither compelling nor impressive. Jesus is impressive.

“For the kingdom of God is not a matter of talk but of power.” (1 Corinthians 4:20).

The evidence of the Kingdom of God is the power of God and the power of God is dependent on the presence of God. The presence of God will be most often be seen when we are in reliance on God. We won’t rely on God from a compromised place of courtesy. We will only rely on Him when we are in over our heads as we walk in the authority of His commissioning into places and circumstances that exceed our career strategy or vacation plans.

The more stuff that we have, the more difficult it is to truly not care about anything except for the commissioning. The more comfortable that we are, the more challenging it is to accept the challenges. It’s increasingly as hard as getting a camel through the eye of a needle.

I don’t even want to write this. I certainly don’t always do it. It was easier to actually do it when there was less to tend to. It was easier to actually believe in the contrast of light and dark that exists in the jails and courthouses among people who are in desperate need of hope and healing. Most of the people I interact with aren’t desperate at all; they are well-churched, well-fed and well-rested. And so am I.

 

Wisdom for The New Year

For many of us, the new year marks a time that we seek wisdom and vision for the circumstances we face going into that new year. We consider the things around us and before us with something of a fresh look and make plans for how to move forward. That look and those plans, however, are limited to the same duplicity and faults that were applied last year unless and until we submit them to a greater Source.

Psalm 2 establishes that Jesus has been ruling and will rule from His throne for eternity. His place is absolute and His perspective is perfect. By His grace, we have access to His rule as we consider the things that we might rule if we will choose to submit our things to Him.

The wisdom we desire for application to the opportunities and challenges we face is available and the first step towards attaining it is towards Him. Proverbs 1:7 says that the beginning of knowledge is the fear of the Lord. but that “fools despise wisdom and instruction.”

To attain the King’s wisdom for our issues, we do so through recognizing His holiness (which will produce what is described as fear of the Lord). Recognition of His holy perfection will only highlight and contrast our imperfections. That’s the beginning of wisdom; true recognition that He is God and we are not.

Fools despise it because they don’t want to be reminded of their foolishness. I suspect that each of us is a fool with some frequency as we would prefer to operate from the limits of our imperfect skills and abilities rather than be reminded of our faults. I know that I am foolish in that way with embarrassing frequency.

The humility required to admit our faults positions us properly in relationship with an eternal and perfect King. We can properly submit our lives and the issues within them to Him as we seek His wisdom, favor and grace. Our humility affords His anointing; that is, when we bow down in recognition of our limits, His Spirit within us is afforded permission through us to present eternity to an earth in need of glimpses of heaven.

True security will facilitate successful relationships, stewardship and influence. That absolute security can’t come from the limits of our soul, but can only be accessed through the fullness of His Spirit. Our humility in recognition of our limitations will grant us the perspective, wisdom and anointing of an eternal King. Our hope for the coming year will be well founded and applicable well beyond the next 365 days.

Invited into Extreme

We are living in extreme times where the rhetoric and divide has escalated negotiable to absolute. At the same time, absolutes are too offensive so things that used to be held as true are compromised for comfort.

In the middle of those political and societal shifts, matters of faith get chipped away at as fringe and extreme. Most people don’t want to be either fringe or extreme so the instinct is to adapt in small ways to remain relevant. Compromise is seldom drastic and the slide is usually indiscernible.

This year, and in the coming years, there will increasingly be no room for compromised faith. There will be no power anywhere except for the extreme and extreme will be easier to attain by contrast to the culture. Weird is weird and it’s increasingly weird just to profess belief, much less to zealously follow and advance the cause of Christ.

Here’s the thing; it’s His cause, not a plank on the platform of the religious right. Extreme faith will be in Him, not ideas about how Him. Reliance on Jesus for supernatural protection, provision and promotion is neither boastful nor argumentative. The argument is in our actions and our choices must be dependent on His power. Our extreme place in these extreme times is less, not more. Less of us and our ideas and more of Him through our humility, brokenness and obedience.

We don’t need better candidates or laws; we need a Church that is as authentic in the sufferings of Christ as they are in the abundance of His Kingdom. We don’t need to win; we need to die. Death to ourselves allows the anointing of His Spirit to exude from us. The compelling extreme of the Holy Spirit circumvents all theological or philosophical debates as He draws others towards Himself despite what we do to repel them.

The coming years of extreme invite us to die to ourselves for the One whom we say we believe. When He invited us to follow Him, the glory He promises is through the crucifixion He modeled. Christianity is neither a spectacle nor a program, but agreement among us in the absolute of Him. He did and does everything that needs to be done; the stuff we attempt to heap on top of His absolute is compromise no matter the intention of our souls.

You Can’t Be Accountable to Yourself and Maximize Your Potential at the Same Time

The Packer’s head coach got fired with the rumor being that he and his quarterback didn’t get along. There then arose some questions about who would lead or hold the quarterback accountable if the coach were going to get fired for contradicting the wishes of the quarterback.

The quarterback, Aaron Rodgers, is quoted as saying, “There’s nobody that holds me more accountable than myself . . . I mean, I’m always checking myself on my preparation habits and my practice habits and my mindset, but there’s always been a great deal of accountability under Mike’s program for the last 13 years.”

I have no idea about the relationship between the two or who needs what accountability. What I am convinced of is that none of us are as adept at holding ourselves accountable as we would like to believe. The presence of an accountable authority is a benefit, not a detriment. The reason being is that for as long as we are accountable to ourselves, we are bound by our own limitations.

Where there is healthy authority, there is a multiplying factor. We are better when accountable to others because our strengths have the context of the group. That means that our shortcomings or weaknesses can be compensated by the strengths of others in the group. Thus, we are elevated despite our limitations as are the others in the group because of our strengths.

Accountability for results is a necessary component to collaboration and collaboration is necessary for greater capacity. Accountability to ourselves, or self-discipline, is a great starting point but it is limited by an incomplete perspective. The view of us that is the least comfortable for us is often the most beneficial for us.

Accountability is more than just correction; it is context and encouragement as well as adjustments and critique. In it’s best form, it is based on a set of finite and defined standards that remove personal preferences and bias to leave cultural norms important to the purpose of the group. Those standards aren’t susceptible to excuse or personality but are deemed necessary for the goals of the group.

You can’t, or at least you shouldn’t, be accountable only to yourself. I assume Aaron Rodgers believes that because he is an accomplished professional in his field. At the same time, the perspective of “me” is not only erroneous, but it is growing in our culture and it presents a limiting factor on our individual and collective potential.