The Benefit of Authority

You know what we all need? A boss. We need somebody to be the authority in our lives. We don’t always want one, but we always need one. I’ve consistently seen the value to oversight and the danger in being left exposed without a covering. Left unchecked, practically all of us will start to divert off course sooner or later.

The value of a boss is that legitimate authority makes a way for us. Submission provides a benefit to the one that is submitted. Where we will come under authority, we have the opportunity to be elevated beyond where we could go without that covering.

The framework of order ordained by God is authority, submission and honor. Without all three, the other two don’t get a chance. In other words, without authority, there is no framework for honor. The framework accommodates purpose that extends beyond our limitations. The framework provides a multiplier to our gifts and abilities that can propel us beyond our ourselves.

Most of us have some bad boss experiences so we wince at the idea that a boss is a good idea. We think we would rather go it alone. If we could just do what we know is right without the hassle of the reports, reprimands, disagreements or other opinions that differ from ours, then we could really get it done. The problem is that left completely without authority, the things that we began with good intentions become distorted by our lack of perspective.

In a corporate setting, authority takes care of itself. In an entrepreneurial or volunteer situation, you may have to be intentional about submitting yourself. Submission doesn’t have to be formal, but it does have to be weight-bearing. To get beyond yourself, you have to welcome the oversight, correction and influence of another. It can be a mentor, assuming you are truly submitted, but that mentor or other influence must be dedicated to your good to the extent that they are not afraid to call out your bad.

Submission is a benefit where there is righteous rule and it is even beneficial where there is unrighteous rule. Where there is righteous rule, authority makes a way for the one that is submitted. Where there is unrighteous rule, authority shapes the character of the one that is submitted. While either can be for just a season, both can propel us on to bigger and better things than we could or would accomplish on our own without the benefit of the framework.

 

 

Reading the Writing of Law and Grace

If you look close enough at any of us, there is evidence against us. We’ve all done stuff that’s contrary to the intention of our design. If we were under the pressure of the burden of keeping the law, we could all be dragged out into the public square for persecution.

That’s what happened when Jesus was presented with a lady who had been caught in the act of adultery. There was compelling, albeit awkward, evidence of her guilt. The people who accused her brought her to Jesus to give Him a chance to defend her. It was a losing case, for Him, they figured as the law was clear and the evidence was sufficient.

When I was practicing law, I defended people who had broken a law all of the time. People, mostly Christian people, asked me (still do, sometimes) how I could morally support the decision to be an advocate for the immoral. It’s easy. Jesus is our advocate and we did “it” in some form or fashion. The case is airtight against us, but He doesn’t turn from us.

In this case where the woman was caught in adultery, His method of defending her was peculiar. He stooped down and wrote in the dirt. Then, He stooped down and wrote in the dirt a second time. In the middle of His stooping and writing, He allowed for anyone that was without sin to begin the punishment of stoning by throwing the first rock. Nobody could, and the old men slipped away first because they had sinned the most.

Jesus wrote in the dirt as a primary tactic in His defense of the woman. While it seems strange, it was actually necessary in the fulfillment of Jesus’ purpose. God had written in the earth with His finger previously and here He was doing it, again. The first time was when He wrote the Ten Commandments. He actually wrote them twice as Moses broke the first set. Now, here He is writing in the earth again. Twice, just like the first time.

The first time God wrote in the earth, He wrote the law. The second time, He wrote grace. Jesus came to satisfy the law for us since we can’t, just like the old men couldn’t. Our perspectives of God and people, starting with ourselves, are reflected what we are writing. We are either writing law or grace and we are only able to write what we receive, first. Realizing that we are not unlike the women allows us to receive grace and it allowed me to defend other people who did “it,” too, just like I have.

The Visible Comes From the Invisible; Do You See It?

There are all kinds of clues, but we have to pay attention. We can see beyond the veil, and the traces of evidence that get us there are in plain sight. Look around and you’ll see God.

While the Kingdom of God is invisible, faith is tangible. As such, the evidence of the Kingdom of God is going to show up in very tangible ways. If we aren’t looking for them, we’ll miss them even when they are right in front of our faces.

When asked of the greatest commandment, Jesus said it was to love God with everything that’s in you but He didn’t stop there. He went on to say that just as important was to love other people as you love yourself. It’s hard to know what’s in us; we can be deceived by our own intentions. It’s easier, however, to work from the outside – in to know things that are deeper.

Jesus said to love others. How are you with others? How are others with you? How are others with others? Not for the purpose of judgment, but for the purpose of identification. Do you see the Kingdom in the way that interactions with people unfold? If not, there is no need to panic; it’s simply an opportunity to invite the Kingdom. “On earth as it is in Heaven.”

The limitation we have regarding our capacity to love people is the degree to which we love ourselves. How well do you love yourself? What habits affirm or challenge your perception of your opinion of yourself? Do you take care of you? Are your words truth or slander? The easiest way to know is when something goes wrong.

The supernatural will reveal itself in natural ways. When we pay attention to the words, actions, options and choices going on all around us, we can ask for eyes to see beyond the obvious. What is God orchestrating and how can we agree with Him in what He may be inviting us into? If we’ll pay attention, we’ll see it and know.

The Christian life is not intended to be perfectly arranged and figured out, like career management. It’s a relationship with a King that is about the expansion of His Kingdom. We get to agree with Him as agents of that Kingdom if we’ll pay attention. His written Word is the framework for our perspective which adds depth of understanding to the things we are able to observe.

When we know the truth, the truth can set us free. Free to be included in the greatest mystery and adventure ever known to man. When we pay attention.

Fear Produces Control Where Love Allows for Wisdom

The other day, I was talking to one of my kids and decided to give them some counsel about some things to look out for. From all appearances, it could be viewed as pretty good parenting. Maybe, to some degree, it was. The problem wasn’t so much the counsel I was giving, it was the driver I was reacting to.

I realized later that night and into the next morning that the reason I chose to speak into the situation (which wasn’t really a situation yet, just the thought of what might become) was that I was afraid. Fear had driven me to warn and counsel where there was an imagination of what might be someday, somehow. Fear is not a healthy driver.

I could have given the exact same advice in the exact same situation and been doing it from love, but I wasn’t. Not this time, anyway. That next morning, I realized the distinction and spent time in prayer receiving the Father’s love. His love casts out fear. I prayed to realize His love for me and for my family, too. His love is the perfect driver.

When our children are small, we have a greater chance of controlling the environments they are exposed to and protecting them from potential threats. Increasingly, however, as they grow they are exposed to the potential of danger and evil as they mature in their ability to relate beyond the controlled environments of their youth. That’s scary. The stuff out there that is intended for their harm is real and active in its pursuit.

We can’t control everything for our kids for ourselves and, at the same time, we don’t have to be afraid. The control we thought we had was a bit of an illusion in the first place as we can never control all possible circumstances to mitigate all possible threats.

We have to rely on love, and not only our love, but the love of the Father. It’s His love that supersedes our fears and feeds our wisdom when we operate from healthy emotions. Unhealthy emotions like fear and worry won’t allow for wisdom as they seek to control. Healthy reactions like trust and faith from knowing the love of the Father gives way to His wisdom in where the boundaries need to be drawn and allows Holy Spirit to counsel us situation by situation.

The Shack is Not the Authority, but Neither are You or I

At the risk of drawing fire from the religious elites, I saw The Shack the other day. I loved it. I loved the sweet and inviting nature of how God was portrayed and it caused me to want to draw closer to Him. I have no intention of defending the movie theologically or entering into a debate about it. I came out encouraged in the Lord, the One True God, and that’s a win.

Whether the movie is perfect or not wasn’t really the question for me as much as I was open to considering God while watching the movie. Neither the book nor the movie will replace my Bible. The story draws me to know Him better and the inspired and infallible Bible reveals His depth like no man-made source can. I saw many things about the God of the Bible portrayed through the characters of The Shack and I agree with those things while considering Him, not my mastery of the philosophy of Him.

God isn’t a history lesson or philosophy to be mastered. God is God, present tense and real beyond comprehension even while being relational. None of us have Him figured out. Not you or me or William P. Young. As far as I can tell, Mr. Young didn’t set out to replace or even supplement the Bible; he was simply telling a story. From what I have read, the essence of that story was born out of Mr. Young’s experience as an abused child and the healing that was found in God as his Father, or Papa.

God stirred my heart in the movie. He called to my humanity and invited me beyond the restraints of this world and into the inexplicable mystery of the next. The depth of eternity is a revelation of the heart much more than it is an understanding of the head. The mystery has value and the pursuit of God through the whispers and whiffs of eternal markers on a temporal trail produce a better me.

People are hurting. Bad things have happened. In this world, we will have trouble. God as Healer, Comforter, Papa and Friend is Biblically sound and personally necessary. Considering Him as Who He is in those reflections of His character might save a life. Forever.

See the movie or don’t see the movie, that isn’t really the point. The idea that you or me or any author of any book has mastered God and cornered the market on the rules of how He should or shouldn’t be shared is a bit arrogant. Don’t be arrogant. I’ll try not to be, too.

 

Don’t Just Go to Work; Carry the Kingdom with Passion and Purpose

When we are searching for our purpose, the first place to inventory is often our passions. The question we are asking is, “why am I here,” and that question requires context. The context is creation and creation is a product of the Creator. The same Creator that initiated the context, designed us for the context.

So how are you wired? What stirs you? What are your passions? These are breadcrumbs on the trail in the journey I touched on in last week’s article.

The passions that are stirred are indicators of design and the design is only legitimate for so long as it fits within the context. This is where it can get tricky, if you aren’t careful. The context is bigger than you, me or any individual. It’s not about us. The passions we uncover aren’t to be explored for the sole purpose of satisfaction, but they are actually indicators of equipping for service. Service within the framework of the context.

The context is the Kingdom of God. He is the Creator and He is the Designer. Everything starts with and comes back to Him. Every gift, ability, passion or purpose within us is designed by Him to be offered back to Him. The fact that the get to feel His pleasure in the pursuit of our purpose in the context of His Kingdom is a bonus.

The Kingdom extends beyond the institution of a church, into the society within which the church operates. The gatherings of “church” have to be considered in the context of the Kingdom. The passions and purposes of the church folks applied in context extends the reach of the church beyond the four walls of the church.

The marketplace needs the gifts of the church for any hope of light in the darkness. In other words, Christians walking in their purpose reach places that won’t be touched by a pastor as people who won’t be attending a church interact with the church in the context of the Kingdom.

The Kingdom is the invisible reality beyond the visible facts (Hebrews 11:3). When working among the world, don’t be satisfied with the visible facts but ask for eyes to see. Ask to see the invisible and reach beyond the tangible. What are the eternal needs in the temporal facts? The answers that God shows you will be in need of a Kingdom ambassador walking in their purpose, given permission by the gifts of their passion to bridge the gap between heaven and earth.